Can Rez Burna Make Mississippi a Hot Spot for Rap?

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Not everyone who wants to be a rapper is going to make it. It may seem harsh, but it’s just a reality that many will have to face. However, having a ton of talent and a few connections can definitely help put your career on the track towards success. Especially if you’re a young up and coming rapper, and that is exactly the winning combination that Rez Burna has.

Hailing from Mississippi, the upstart rapper has been steadily making a name for himself. He’s gaining more and more fans by providing a steady stream of southern yet lyrical raps that have resonated with his core followers. Now with a big time collabo under his belt, courtesy of fellow southerner – Waka Flocka Flame, Rez looks to ride the wave of recognition to his own fame. (Read about Waka Flocka Flame’s PETA ad.)

What makes you different from other southern rappers?

What makes my style different from other southern rappers is the fact that I take lyricism to the extreme. It’s very important to me. When I listen to other artists it doesn’t seem as if it’s as important to them as it is to me. I take it almost like how a New York rapper would take it. I can’t even listen to people if they don’t have any type of lyricism about their music.

How do you feel about the southern rappers who can be considered true lyricists, and who would you say is a true lyricist in your own opinion?

There are plenty to me. Wayne is one off top. I even feel like these rappers who people consider street rappers or hood rappers like Boosie and Webbie are lyricists in their own right because it all depends on what you define lyricism as and I think people have a misconception as to what lyricism really is. It doesn’t have to metaphors and similes, or a certain flow. As long as you’re getting your story across and it’s not bubble gum than its lyricism.

What’s it been like trying to be a rapper and having to come out of Mississippi?

It’s difficult because there are no major outlets here. There’s nowhere where you can take it and tell them to check it out and it can put you out there on a national scale, so you really have to be in touch with the surrounding cities. If you’re not going out to your Mobile’s or your Atlanta’s or your New Orleans’ then you’re basically just going to be stuck in the same box because those cities have more people in them than we have in the whole state.

How long have you been doing music at a professional level?

I’ve been pursuing it professionally for about two to three years, but I’ve been doing it for around six years.

What were some of the moments that made you really want to give it a go, as far as making a living doing music?

I began to really want to pursue it as a career when it became realistic to me and it wasn’t just a dream anymore because the opportunities were there to actually make moves other than what I had seen people do around me. I’ve been in contact with several people who have made it like Soulja Boy and Roscoe Dash and watched them all come up because it’s the internet age and we all had the ability to connect with each from the very beginning. So, I just watched them all come up and seeing them do it let me know that I could do it too.

What would you say was that first real big opportunity that you’ve had so far?

The biggest opportunity that I’ve had so far is the chance to work with Waka as well as going down to Atlanta and doing a Digiwaxx performance.

How were you able to connect with Waka Flocka Flame?

It was through a mutual friend of ours from a promotion site called Digiwaxx that I had been working with him and he gave me the opportunity to work with a bigger name artist on the song. I wrote the song about three years ago and I had someone else on there and he felt like I should take that person off and replace them with a star and I with it, so he brought Waka to the table.

How do you feel about the reception to the collaboration track between yourself and Waka?

I like the reception we just haven’t had the time to really promote it the way we’ve done other songs and other projects, but I’m pretty sure once the mixtape drops and we shoot the video for it, it will get more of the response I’m looking for.

What’s the deal with the new mixtape?

I named the mix tape high resolution because I want everybody to see me and feel me as a person and an artist. I want everybody to feel it in every aspect, so I touched on different topics on this mixtape compared to previous ones. There’s a lot more subject matter on this one.

What’s the label situation looking like for you?

I’m indie, but I’m looking to go major. It’s my dream to go to Cash Money because I grew up on them. From what I hear there’s a little buzz on the streets, nothing too big yet, but I think something is coming.

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